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It’s no secret that nose to tail butchery is a culinary trend, yet many don’t realize the reason behind it. Pork chops and chicken breasts pervade meat counters at local grocers, and consequently are forcing ranchers to produce these cuts in mass quantities which has devastating effects on heritage breeds and sustainable ranches. Not to mention that underappreciated cuts like Guanciale, Zabuton Beef and Lamb Cheeks are delicious.

Coming up this month Skillet Chef Nick Novello will showcase his passion for nose to talk butchery and sustainability in the Butcher Cut Series, a weekly installment of special menus offered Friday evenings. More detail is in the press release below. 

This June, Skillet partners with Niman Ranch for the Butcher Cut Series, a delectable weekly offering designed to bring awareness to the whole animal, sourced responsibly and raised with care. Offered Friday evenings, June 5 through June 26 at the Capitol Hill and Ballard Skillet, Chef Nick Novello will present a different four-course menu each week that focuses on underappreciated cuts – from pig heads and lamb cheeks to Guanciale and Zabuton beef.

“Niman Ranch does an incredible job of raising heritage breeds for nose to tail butchery – rather than just the cuts you’re used to seeing in mass quantities,” said Skillet Chef Nick Novello, who is spearheading the program. “When animals are raised with care it equates to undeniable flavor. You can’t argue with flavor, so come join us for a delicious adventure and support our sustainable farmers and ranchers.” 

“Our commitment to small independent family farmers, ranchers and their local communities, sustainable agriculture practice and humane animal care sets us apart,” said Jeff Tripician, EVP Niman Ranch. “All of these working together produce the finest tasting meat that you can feel good about eating.”

Menu highlights include smoked and braised lamb belly served with goat cheese, rice flour gnocchi, grilled corn, shaved parmesan, fresh herbs and a sunny egg; Zabuton beef with cauliflower puree, grilled endive, smashed fingerlings; and pork short ribs with huckleberry soy glaze, white cheddar cheese grits, toasted chia seeds, charred leeks and turmeric fried cauliflower.

Each evening includes a four-course meal that ranges from $30-$35 per person. The first three courses each feature a different cut and the fourth course will vary between house-made sweet corn ice cream or a hand blended black and white milkshake. For complete menus & to make a reservation visit the website at www.skilletstreetfood.com

We are thrilled to announce New York Times food reporter and author Kim Severson as keynote of this year's International Food Blogger Conference this September 18-20, 2015 in Seattle, Washington. Kim has been a staff writer for The New York Times since 2004.  She is a correspondent based in the South, reporting on the nation’s food and culture. She is also a contributor to NYT Cooking, a new website and app based on the extensive New York Times collection of recipes and cooking videos.

Previously, Kim was the Times’ Southern bureau chief, covering a mix of breaking and political news. Before she joined Times, Kim spent six years writing about food for the San Francisco Chronicle. She also had a seven-year run as an editor and reporter at The Anchorage Daily News in Alaska. Over the course of her earlier newspaper career, she covered crime, education, social services and government for daily newspapers on the West Coast.

Kim has won several regional and national awards for news and feature writing, including four James Beard awards for food writing and the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism for her work on childhood obesity in 2002.

Her latest book is Cookfight, written with fellow New York Times food writer Julia Moskin and published by Ecco in October 2012. Her memoir, Spoon Fed: How Eight Cooks Saved My Life, (Riverhead) was published in 2010. She has also written The New Alaska Cookbook and The Trans Fat Solution: Cooking and Shopping to Eliminate the Deadliest Fat from Your Diet.

She lives in Atlanta with her partner and her daughter.

Follow Kim on Facebook and Twitter.

Visit her website here.

Christopher Testani was born and raised in upstate New York and studied cinema and photography at Ithaca College. In 2012 he was selected as one of PDN magazine’s 30 photographers to watch. His work has been featured in a number of publications such as House & Garden, Martha Stewart Living, Real Eats, Bon Appétit, Cooking Light, Every Day with Rachael Ray, Food & Wine, and many more.

He’s an avid cook, outdoor enthusiast and traveler, and his work draws inspiration from the things he loves - good food, nature, new people and places, and the stories that bring them all together.

Join Christopher at the International Food Blogger Conference on Sunday, September 20 for an exciting session on everything food photography!

Inside the small garden plot behind The Herbfarm restaurant in Woodinville, Wa., the host calls out to the slowly meandering crowd and tries her best to project her voice out to the stragglers. “If you can eat the leaves, you can eat the flowers,” she says loudly, while holding a basil bunch in her hands and standing on the wall of a raised garden bed.  

  

She is addressing a very well-heeled crowd of about 50 people, all of whom are walking through the garden and carrying cocktails, grinding said heels into fine gravel walkways and listening intently over the background music from an ongoing wedding. It’s not the typical preamble to a nine-course dinner in a formal dining room, but the introduction to the gardens is meant to both educate and set the tone for an extraordinary dining experience. 

  

Both the gardens and the dinner are the brainchild of Ron Zimmerman and his wife and partner, Carrie Van Dyck. The gardens are the living muse for the kitchen at The Herbfarm, the now-25- year-old restaurant that has received global accolades over its many years in business.  

  

For four nights a week, a themed menu—this years menu titles include “The Mycologists Dream” and “The Herbal Atelier”—with nine courses and five beverage pairings is served. These menus are strictly derived from local ingredients, farms and gardens, including both the herb garden on site and another five-acre farm located across town.  

  

For dinner, guests arrive early for a tour of the gardens before being seated in a formal dining room full of antiques, bric-a-brac and family heirlooms collected by Ron and Carrie over the years. While dinner is a long, evening-encompassing affair, the night tends to move quickly. The entire staff is introduced, guests are encouraged to get up and move about between courses (either for a quick round of bocce or to feed the pigs out by the garden) and soon enough, a small dessert plate is set down with meringues, pate de fruit and a cup of chicory root ‘coffee’ and it’s time to go. Time flies when you’re having fun. 

 

Fortunately for us, The Herbfarm Chef, Chris Weber, will be serving herbal delicacies from the restaurant grounds on Saturday night at the Culinary Fair and Expo. Be sure to stop by, have a chat and learn about the amazing history at this restaurant, and the inspiring resume of this young, impressive chef.

 

About The Herbfarm

 

Since 1986, The Herbfarm has promoted the foods of the Pacific Northwest through its nightly 9-course dinners. Begun before “farm-to-table” was even coined, the restaurant totally rewrites its menu every 2 or 3 weeks to showcase foods from its own 5-acres as well as the forests, farms, and waters of the Northwest. Inherent to The Herbfarm’s philosophy, is that what comes from here is every bit as good as anywhere in the world. If it doesn’t originate here, it isn’t simply isn’t used. Diverse and organic, the Herbfarm grows over 100 field crops, harvests its own eggs, maintains beehives, and raises Gloucester Old Spot pigs. Notable crops include naturalized plantings of the native Nodding Onion, Pellegrini Beans (rescued from the last 11 beans known), the Ozette Potato of 1792, and the ancient field corn that the Abenaki tribe introduced to the Pilgrims in the 1600’s. Produce is harvested and delivered to the restaurant kitchen daily.

 

The Herbfarm is located at 14590 NE 145th Street, Woodinville WA, www.theherbfarm.com

 

Judith Dern has served as senior manager, digital books, at Allrecipes.com the world’s #1 digital food brand, supervising content development and the production of 13 exclusive digital-only cookbooks. At Allrecipes, she is part of the Brand Marketing team where she writes posts for Allrecipes’ Fresh Bites blog and supervises outreach for key food media. She has also provided marketing support to launch Allrecipes’ 16 international sites. A published author with three cookbooks to her credit, most recently The Food and Cooking of Scandinavia: Sweden, Norway & Denmark (2011, Lorenz Publishing, London), she has also contributed to 10 other cookbooks as an independent writer, plus written numerous national and regional articles about food, Scandinavia and textiles. A member of IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals), she is the chair of the New Media section.

Judith will co-host an exciting session on Food Trends at this year's IFBC.

Follow Judith on Twitter @AllrecipesJDern

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