Bulgur

About

A type of wheat originating in Turkish cuisine. To make bulgur, wheat is cooked and then dried in the sun. The technique is an ancient way to preserve wheat without grinding it into flour. It can be coarsely or finely ground; different dishes require different grinds. Pilaf uses thicker bulgur, while tabbouleh uses the finer grind. Thick bulgur cooks faster than rice but needs a rest period before serving; use a ratio of 1.5 cups water to 1 cup bulgur for 10-15 minutes, then wrap the pot lid in a towel, remove the pot from heat and let rest for 10 minutes. The towel will absorb the steam. Moisten finely-ground bulgur with hot water for a few minutes, and the grains will swell and be ready to use.

Information

Other names: Bulghur, Durum Wheat, Bulgar
Translations: Bulguri, Πλιγούρι, Apvirti ir išdžiovinti, البرغل, Boulgour, ブルグア, בורגול, Булгур, Булгур, 小麦片, Булгур, Булгур

Physical Description

Colors: yellow, golden,

Tasting Notes

Flavors: nutty
Mouthfeel: Grainy, Rich, Smooth
Substitutes: Cracked wheat, Quinoa, Rice whole wheat couscous

Selecting and Buying

Seasonality: january, february, march, april, may, june, july, august, september, opctober, november, december
Choosing: Be careful when buying Bulgur as it is sometimes confused with cracked wheat.
Buying: You can buy Bulgur all year round in stores and is usually sold parboiled, dried and partially de-branned.

Be careful when buying Bulgur as it is sometimes confused with cracked wheat, although unlike cracked wheat bulgur has already been parboiled.

Procuring: Bulgur is made from a variety of different wheat grains.

Preparation and Use

Once boiled in a little stock or water it is ready for use. It is an excellent replacement for meat in vegetarian dishes or a partial meat substitute.

Social/Political

History: Making Bulgur is an ancient process that originates in the Med but which has been a massive part of Middle Eastern cuisine for thousands of years. In approximately 3,000 B.C. Emperor Shen Nung declared it one of five sacred crops along with rice, millet, barley and soybeans. It can also be seen in the Bible, being used by ancient Babylonians, Hittites and Hebrew populations approx 4,000 years ago.

Author

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Comments

Yummyfoodies's picture

hmmm , we dont cook bulgur. just soak it in cold water.

Yummyfoodies's picture

hmmm , we dont cook bulgur. just soak it in cold water.