Julia Child's Plum Clafouti

Foodista Cookbook Entry

Category: Desserts & Sweets | Blog URL: http://gratinee.wordpress.com/2009/09/18/julia-childs-plum-clafouti/

This recipe was entered in The Foodista Best of Food Blogs Cookbook contest, a compilation of the world’s best food blogs which was published in Fall 2010.

Ingredients

1 pound firm, ripe plums
Boiling water
1/4 cup orange liqueur, kirsch, or cognac
1/3 cup sugar
Milk
3 eggs
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup flour
Powdered sugar for dusting

Preparation

1
Preheat oven to 350F.
2
Drop plums in boiling water for exactly 10 seconds. Peel. Slice them or leave whole. Let stand with liqueur, kirsch, or cognac and 1/3 cup sugar for 1 hour. Reserve liquid and add enough milk to measure 1 1/4 cups.
3
Place liqueur milk mixture along with the eggs, vanilla, salt, and flour in a blender. Cover and blend on high for 1 minute.
4
Pour a 1/4-inch layer of batter in a baking dish or pie plate. Set over moderate heat for a minute or two until a film of batter has set in the bottom of the dish. remove from heat. Place plums over the batter and pour on the remaining batter; smooth the surface with the back of a spoon.
5
Place in the middle position of preheated oven and bake for about an hour. The clafouti is done when it has puffed and browned, and a knife plunged into its center comes out clean.
6
Sprinkle top of clafouti with powdered sugar just before bringing it to the table.
7
The clafouti need not be served hot, but should still be warm. It will sink down slightly as it cools.

Tools

 



About

I find the more I cook and immerse myself in the world of food via various magazines and food blogs, the more I come to understand that there is so much I don’t know. This year I set out to become a food and travel writer and have achieved some success, but I realize that there is so much I’m going to have to learn about food if I want to have a career in this field. Since I think all of life is a learning curve, I don’t mind admitting my foibles in this regard. I have never eaten an artichoke and have no idea how to cook one. I love food but am a picky eater; although there are few foods that I dislike intensely, there are many that I don’t love and I feel life is too short to spend eating them. I would love to review restaurants, but I don’t think I could be objective enough to comment on organ meats or other such fare that is standard at some of these fine establishments that I read about yet have not gone to. Sadly, I will never be a restaurant critic for the New York Times, donning disguises and dining at Lutece. Another curiosity: my favorite food is French, but until my trip to France last year, I had scarcely eaten it. My idea of French food was limited to quiche, onion soup, and potato gratin. Rather ironic considering I now regularly write about French restaurants in my hometown for some well-known online publications. Until I bought my copy of Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking, I didn’t even know what clafouti was. I looked it up online, hoping to find a picture of this dessert which wasn’t a cake or a pancake, or a custard, but a combination of all three. In fact, the first time I made a clafouti I expected a very cake-like texture and thought I had not baked it long enough. I made a mistake by not cooking some of batter before topping it with cherries and another layer of batter. I thought this was why the texture was so custard-like. I had no idea that it was supposed to be that way. Now that I’ve been set straight, I love to whip up a clafouti when I want something easy–something with fruit. I like to have it for breakfast on a weekend morning, instead of pancakes, sprinkled with icing sugar. In MtAoFC, Julia has a master recipe for Cherry Clafouti, and then a list of variations. I chose to make the Clafouti aux Pruneaux because it’s the perfect time of year for plums. In this variation, she asks you to drop them in boiling water and peel them. I found the prospect of this too tedious, so I simply cut the plums in half (I used small ones) and sprinkled them with sugar. Otherwise I followed the master recipe, which I include here with my one little tweak. Instead of plums, you can also use sliced apple or pear instead of plums. Clafouti can be a perfect summer or winter dessert, depending on the fruit you use. Now that is what I call versatile.

Other Names:

plum flan, clafoutis, plum clafouti, plum clafoutis, Clafouti aux Pruneaux

Yield:

6-8 people

Added:

Monday, December 28, 2009 - 9:02am

Creator:

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