First Fat Tax Takes Effect

October 5, 2011

Denmark became the first country in the world to impose a fat tax, even as critics remained skeptical that the new legislation would change the way people in the country eat. 

Starting this week, Danes can expect to pay an extra 16 Kroner (just under $3) per kilo when the saturated fat content in a food item exceeds 2.3 percent. In more practical terms, that means customers will pay an additional $.12 per bag of chips and $.40 more for a hamburger

The jury remains out on what effect the tax will have—if any. Nevertheless, politicians in the United States and the United Kingdom will closely watch the effects of the law. Both countries are struggling with morbidly obese populations. One estimate suggests that 70 percent of Brits will be overweight or obese by 2050, but earlier studies have found that a soda tax did nothing to curb obesity rates. 

All revenue from the tax will go into anti-obesity measures in Denmark.  

What do you think? Would a fat tax work in the United States? 

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Comments

Matt's picture

This is dumb as. When did obesity rates take off? Right after western governments changed their official dietary advice to advocate that people obtained most of their daily calorific intake from carbohydrates in the late 70s/early 80s is when.

And where do most people obtain most of their daily calorific intake today? Not from saturated fats.

So what do we fight against? Saturated fats.

Dumb, dumb and dumber.

gxsrgurl1's picture

Nope fat americans will get fatter. The tan tax didn't stop me from tanning.

 




 

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